Unit 7: Information File

Edwardian Teddy Boy, 1953

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Teddy Boys sourced from: http://edwardianteddyboy.com/

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Russian Teddy Boys 1983, Leningrad

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Looking at clothing worn by Russian and Engligh Teddy Boys

In the novel, a large part of the character development is based on descriptions of what people are wearing. I wanted to look into the clothes of the Teddy Boys from the period of time that the book was written, to see what the style was. I find this interesting because the boys look so stylish and it reminds me of some of the trendy boys in gangs that you see hanging around Whitechapel and Shoreditch in London. However, after doing some research into this, I have decided that I would like my costumes designs not to be based on the classic trouser, jacket male clothing combo, I want it to be more abstract and organically drawn from the narrative of the book itself and from my own imagination of what the characters would look like.

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LOOKING AT RUSSIAN ABSTRACT ARTWORK

- Visit to exhibition 'Adventures of the black square' at the Whitechapel Gallery

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Kazimir Malevich

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Kazimir Malevich

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LOOKING AT RUSSIAN AVANT-GARDE

- Exhibition at The Victoria & Albert Museum - Russian avant-garde theatre - war, revolution and design 1913-1933

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Vera Mukhina theatre design for Alexander Exeter's play The Jesters supper 1916

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Costume design for Romeo and Juliette 1921

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Aleksandra Ekster, sketch, Lobanov-Rostovsky coll

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Aleksandra Exter, sketch

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Reading other dystopian novels: George Orwell '1984'

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Looking at Machines - Alex as a machne made to be "good"

"You are committed to socially acceptable acts, a little machine capable only of good" (Burgess 1962 p127)

"A man who cannot choose ceases to be a man" (Burgess 1962 p127)

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Machine: an apparatus using mechanical power and having several parts, each with a definite function and together performing a particular task.

(https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=machine&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-GB:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&gfe_rd=cr&ei=XATnVJaEIMqc5gaDioEg&gws_rd=ssl#rls=com.microsoft:en-GB:IE-Address&q=machine+definition)

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Machines research - generator

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Edward Scisor Hands - film

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Edard Scissorhands costume

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upcycled work

This piece is a collage of found objects, or parts thereof, to create figurative and abstract images. The idea of appropriating existing objects to create works has a long tradition in twentieth century art: from Marcel Duchamp’s first “Readymades” in 1915, through Cesar Baldaccini’s repeated objects in the ‘60s to our own Tony Cragg’s wall pieces made from colour graded rainbows of discarded fragments of plastic. The eleven featured artists display not only ingenious ways of manipulating and presenting their upcycled media, but also creative terms to describe their source material including: “findings” and “re-purposed objects

(reference from http://news.fitzrovia.org.uk/2013/04/15/ffound-by-various-artists-at-the-woolff-gallery/)

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Horn

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Image

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Design drawing for Alex

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Looking at faces in pain

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When I was designing the face for my mask, I started searching for faces in pain, disturbed faces as inspiration for the expression of Alex at the point of the book where he is having the treatment done to him in prison. A common image that came up while I was searching online was images of Vietnamese babies affected by Agent Orange during WW2. The images are shocking and upsetting. The facial features of the babies are disfigured and disjointed.

I have decided through looking at these images that I want my mask to capture this feeling of dehumanisation, where they don't even look human. After Alex has the treatment done to him in prison, as it states in the novel, there is no way that Alex come remain "a man" after enduring that. Also, the photo's seem relevant  to some of the film photage he I forced to watch in order to "become good". People being tortured and injured during war.

INFO ON AGENT ORANGE (images sourced from http://www.talkvietnam.com/2014/06/agent-orange-pain-painful-images-from-tu-du-hospital/, text: http://www.history.com/topics/vietnam-war/agent-orange)

Agent Orange was a powerful mixture of chemical defoliants used by U.S. military forces during the Vietnam War to eliminate forest cover for North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops, as well as crops that might be used to feed them. The U.S. program of defoliation, codenamed Operation Ranch Hand, sprayed more than 19 million gallons of herbicides over 4.5 million acres of land in Vietnam from 1961 to 1972. Agent Orange, which contained the chemical dioxin, was the most commonly used of the herbicide mixtures, and the most effective. It was later revealed to cause serious health issues–including tumors, birth defects, rashes, psychological symptoms and cancer–among returning U.S. servicemen and their families as well as among the Vietnamese population.

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Vegard Vinge and Ida Muller

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Vegard Vinge and Ida Muller

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Vegard Vinge and Ida Muller

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VEGARD VINGE AND IDA MULLER

Their plays take stylistic and structural cues from platter films, opera, melodrama, puppet theatre, performance arts and fairy tales. Their signature aesthetic is handmade and painted cardboard scenic designs, pre-recorded text and large sections of the plays are improvised. The characters usually wear creepy rubber masks and  the stories are usually about children who must battle a corrupt adult world - leading to scenes of gory carnage with lots of fake blood.

Their work has been described as "hours of repulsion sex, blood and massacre". For me this almost paints a description of how one could view A Clockwork Orange.

(Referenced from http://www.academia.edu/2237338/The_Total_Radical_Fiction_Vegard_Vinge_and_Ida_M%C3%BCllers_Ibsen-Saga)

I find these plays bizarre but fascinating. The rubber masks are really effective in making the characters look so eerie and scary. The set is so intriguing, the handmade effect is very different to anything I've seen before. I particularly think the shot in black and white (below) looks very effective. I would like to shoot my film in black and white and use masks.

 

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Vegard Vinge and Ida Muller

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LOOKING AT MOVEMENT AND DANCE IN PERFORMANCE

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Sasha Waltz - 'Sacre' Finale

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Sacre

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This piece 'Sacre' by Sasha Waltz has been described as an uplifting dance affair, which denounces female sacrifice, a wild outcry against war and violence. The dancers make sudden, short expressive movements to the music. They move around in circles with their arms and hands flexed out above their heads, to the sudden sound of the music. I find this very dramatic and an effective use of simple movements which connotes a feeling of panic and fear in the dancers. This is the kind of dance movement that I would like to incorporate into my choreography for Alex when he is wearing the wire masked costume. The sudden movement in Sacre makes me think of ticking clockwork. The way that the dancers jump suddenly on the spot in a circular movement makes me think of the ticking hands of a clock. I would like to experiment with this movement when I film my costume for character Alex in the dark room at Archway.

 

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DV8 Physical Theatre 'The Cost of Living'

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DV8

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DV8

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In this piece by DV8 'The Cost of Living', the opening of the film starts with these clown heads moving in unison and at different times. It gives off an eerie, disturbing feeling with the fixed expression being a mix between happy and evil. This is how I would like my face mask for Alex as violent teen to look, smiley but with something else going on behind the smile. I think the simple head movements are very effective and I may incorporate this into the dance movement for Alex which I will film at the white room in Archway.  

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Anne teresa de keersmaeker 'Rosas'

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Anne teresa de keersmaeker 'Rosas'

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I like the slickness and quickness of the movements in this piece by Anne teresa de keersmaeker. This creates a rhythm of its own with the sounds of the dancer bodies slapping into each position, with the use of repetition of movement and poses.

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Meredith Monk 'Songs of Ascension'

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Meredith Monk

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I also like the simplicity of the choreography in this piece by Monk. I think the setting for this is amazing and inspiring to see how you can play with camera angles to show the spiral of the stairs and dancers moving up it.

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Edwardian Teddy Boy

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Edwardian Teddy Boy

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Kazimir Malevich

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Kazemir Malevich

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Sophie Taeuber-Arp

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Lyubov Popova

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Lyubov Popova Textile Design

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Lyubov Popova Sample of Printed Fabric

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Costume design for the play 'Dinner Jokes'

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Vera Mukhina

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Aleksandra Ekster for the Kamerny Theatre

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How is my idea relevant to what is happening now? Russian conflict in the past correlates to Russia Ukraine crisis

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Putin speaking to Russia about want to invade Ukraine

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Pussy riot

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Pussy Riot

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Pussy Riot

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Pussy Riot

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Pussy Riot is a Russian feminist punk rock protest group based in Moscow. Founded in August 2011, it has a variable membership of approximately 11 women[1] ranging in age from about 20 to 33 (as of 2012).[2] The group stages unauthorised provocative guerrilla performances in unusual public locations, which are edited into music videos and posted on the Internet.[3] The collective's lyrical themes include feminism, LGBT rights, and opposition to Russian President Vladimir Putin, whom the group considers a dictator,[2] and to his links with the leadership of the Russian Orthodox Church.[4]

On February 21, 2012, five members of the group staged a performance in Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior.[5] The group's actions were eventually stopped by church security officials. By that evening, the collective had turned the performance into a music video entitled "Punk Prayer - Mother of God, Chase Putin Away!"[6] The women said their protest was directed at the Orthodox Church leader's support for Putin during his election campaign. The head of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Kirill I, said the performers were doing the work of the devil.[7]

On March 3, 2012, two of the group members, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina, were arrested and charged with hooliganism. A third member, Yekaterina Samutsevich, was arrested on March 16. Denied bail, they were held in custody until their trial began in late July. On August 17, 2012, the three members were convicted of "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred", and each was sentenced to two years imprisonment.[8][9][10] Two other members of the group, who escaped arrest after the February protest, reportedly left Russia fearing prosecution.[11] On October 10, following an appeal, Samutsevich was freed on probation and her sentence suspended. The sentences of the other two women were upheld.[12] In late October 2012, Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova were sent to separate prisons.

 

(sourced from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pussy_Riot)

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LOOKING AT FACES - EVIL/ DARK/ DISTRURBED/ IN PAIN

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Tony Oursler at The Lisson Gallery

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Tony Oursler

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Visit to the Lisson Gallery - Tony Oursler artwork analysis

I really like Tony Oursler's faces. The way that the large scale cardboard pieces were placed in the gallery, made it feel like the faces were people watching you as you walked around the rooms. They had a presence of their own. I particularly like the way that the eyes and mouths are sectioned into rectangles and squares, in different contrasting colours. This made me think about how I would like to express Alex at the point in the book where he is having the prison treatment done to him, he become separated from his former self, slowly becoming a "machine". I think it is a visual way of conveying this feeling of disjointedness, having the eyes in different sizes on the face with a sectioned mouth, as though he is no longer in control of what he says and what he sees; like when he is forced to watch the violent films. I love this artwork and am going to experiment using wire and mod roc.

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The Lisson Gallery - Cross section of a revolution, Allora & Calzadilla, Broomberg & Chanarin, Liu Xiaodong, Haroon Mirza, Rashid Rana, Wael Shawky, Santiago Sierra

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Looking at scale

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Oskar Schlemmer - the triadic ballet

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Joel Peter Witkin - disturbing faces

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Joel Peter Witkin

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Joel Peter Witkin

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Joel Peter Witkin

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DV8 'John'

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DV8 'John'

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DV8

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DV8

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In the short clip that I could find from this piece 'John' by DV8, the male dancer weaves around the set and inbetween the walls, creeping around looking at things. I like this use of space and I would like  to use this method of movement in my filming of Alex as violent teen at the beginning of my film. There is a pillar at Archway in the white room which I think this could work well with. I also like the way the dancers flex their body forward and back and then stumble to the floor. It is a nice simple use of movement. I would like to use an aspect of this from when I film Alex in the wire masked costume, he could fall to the ground in this way after convulsing in sudden short movements.

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Meredith Monk '16 Millimeter Earrings'

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Meredith Monk

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I find Meredith Monk's work very bizarre but I like the simplicity of the dancers movement in the piece '16 Millimeter Earrings'. I  think I could develop some of her poses into a masculine pose for Alex in the filming of my wire-masked costume.

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Miet Warlop 'Mystery Magnet'

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Miet Warlop

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MW

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MW

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I love the way Miet Warlop creates a wonderful scene of chaos; With the screen getting torn into and actors heads poking through it and paint being dripped all over the floor. More specifically in this piece 'Mystery Magnet' I find the men in black interesting characters, with black pillow case type costumes over their heads so that they can't see. They are forced to fumble around on stage. I am trying to do this with Alex's masked costume, so that he appears blind and can't see where he is (thus becoming a machine and no longer a man). Although differently to this, I would lke this pat to connote a sense of sadness to the audience for what he has become, unlike in this piece where the characters inability to see on stage carries a comical value.

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Comments

TerryjabBX
02 October 2017, 10:44 PM
Doctor Who is now considered a British Institute and has come a long way since it first aired on November 23rd 1963. The very first show saw the Doctor travel 100,00 years into the past to help some dim cavemen discover light. After 26 seasons and seven Doctors later the series came off our screens in 1989 much to the disappointment of the huge devoted fanbase. In 1996 an attempt was made to revive Doctor Who but it wasnt until June 2005 when it came back with a vengeance with Christopher Eccleston as the ninth Doctor that put the series back on the map as it were. It then went on for 5 years with David Tenant portraying the Doctor until 2010 when Matt Smith took over the role. Today it is still a great family show and has attracted many new fans.

If youre a new or old fan of the show there are Tours and museums you can go and see some of the locations and memorabilia of this classic show. The Doctor Who Tour of London will take you on over 15 locations from the show, some from the new series and some from old sites like the location of The Invasion and Resurrection of the Darleks. The tour also takes you to the TV museum in London where you will get to see some of the cosumes worn in the show and props used. Also you can buy gifts and memorabilia from the shop.

You will learn all about how the shows were made so the tour is also educational. If you want to take pictures of the locations thats not a problem. Remember the front door of 10 Downing Street in Aliens of London? Well you can get up and close to this and get your picture taken in front of the door. Rose Tyler fans will love the tour as you get to drop by her home in the show.

Why not go that extra mile and actually meet a Doctor Who star. Well this is possible with private or group tours. You will get the general tour but included will be a pre-arranged meeting or lunch with a celebrity from the show. This will obviously depend on availability of the celebrity and the cost will reflect the popularity of that celebrity.

There are tours in London and also Wales. The Wales tours take you to Cardiff where you will see lots of location which were featured in shows since 2005. You can leave from London or at Leigh Delamere services station on the M4. There is a Doctor Who exhibition in Cardiff which you get to see. At the end of the Doctor Who tour you get a souvenir group picture sent you by email which is a nice touch.

For seriously devoted Doctor Who fans there is a 3 day tour which takes you to all the locations in both London and Cardiff. You will see locations from the past 45 years as well as recent sites from the lasted Doctor Who series. Day one is based in London where you get to see 15 sites. Day two takes you to Cardiff where you get to mean the real life owner of the to see we have an Gothic property used as the location of the school in Human Nature. The final day is partly spent in Cardiff with a walking tour at Cardiff Bay, then you head back to London but a stop at Stonehenge to see the site of the Pandoica. Then its dinner at The Cloven Hoof pub in Devils End b efore you taken back to central London.

 
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